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In our next case study, we will be examining the story of Fred (an alias). Fred came to us after a personal recommendation from a family friend after multiple visits to multiple hearing professionals. Fred’s story goes like this:

Fred had been to multiple professionals searching for the best results with hearing aids but ran into some issues which left him in search of something better. His past experiences had shown him that while the professionals he visited had mostly been very kind, caring people there was a lack of:

You may have noticed our recurring theme, “where you go is more important than what you get.” In support of this, we will be posting some case studies reviewing different situations where the services we provide made a big difference for someone who was otherwise not using hearing aids they received somewhere else.

In this case, the patient had good quality hearing aids they were fit with somewhere else but never received the proper benefit from them. After repeated visits to her original provider, she came to us hoping that we would be able to help her hear better with those same hearing aids. Below outlines the problems she came to us with and how we were able to help get her hearing well consistently with those same devices. The names used in the story are fake, for everyone’s privacy of course!

The business of fitting hearing aids is one that is not without competition, especially in a densely populated area such as northern New Jersey. All business’ have competition to a certain extent however we believe a business which thrives by providing a highly specialized service (not just a commoditized product) falls into a different realm. Successfully combining professional ability, honesty, candor, ability to listen and understand your customers, and empathy - is not something done equally well among all working people.

This is in fact why some business’ providing professional services do a better job than others. When It comes to fitting hearing aids, which is a process whose

Properly fit, quality hearing aids can be expensive. It is important to realize that the price for "hearing aids" encompasses much more than just the devices themselves (considering they are being purchased through a hearing healthcare professional).  To properly answer this question, consider the following:

-       Quality, high performing hearing devices cost the manufacturers of these devices considerable resources to research and develop, produce (on a relatively small scale compared to cell phones or computers), and support (all devices come with a warranty).  Hearing aids are used in a pretty rough environment exposed to ear wax, sweat, dust, hairspray, etc…so that warranty is important.

Untreated hearing loss (not wearing a hearing aid) can lead to social, psychological and physical issues. While the effects of hearing loss are different for each individual, most hearing-impaired people suffer some consequences until they seek treatment.

Ahrens Hearing Aid Center in Fair Lawn, NJ, can assist you on your path to healthy hearing. Call 201-794-0120 today to schedule an appointment.

Studies have linked untreated hearing loss to:

Social consequences, including:

  • Lack of concentration
  • Problems communicating with your spouse, relatives and friends
  • Problems communicating at work
  • Reduced social activity
  • Isolation and withdrawal

Psychological consequences, including:

  • Sadness and depression
  • Feelings of embarrassment, guilt, shame and anger
  • Low self-esteem and self-criticism
  • Increased anxiety

Physical consequences, including:

  • Frequent headaches
  • Stress
  • Sexual problems
  • Tiredness and exhaustion
  • Sleeping and eating problems

The National Council on Aging (NCOA) linked untreated hearing loss to serious mental health challenges, especially in seniors. In a survey of those with untreated hearing issues, the NCOA found that two-thirds of the respondents age 55 and over didn’t believe they needed a hearing aid. About half of the non-users cited the cost of hearing aids. And, one in five expressed embarrassment, and said that hearing aids would make them feel old.

However, hearing loss isn’t just an ailment of aging – it affects all ages, even those in early childhood. For young sufferers, even a mild case of hearing loss can cause difficulty learning, delayed speech and difficultly building interpersonal skills. Children with untreated hearing loss might have difficulty in school and developing healthy self-esteem.

At Ahrens Hearing Center, our caring staff provides full-care hearing loss support. We perform thorough audiometric evaluations to gauge your hearing abilities and limitations. If you need hearing aids, we provide hearing device sales, fittings and other services necessary for your individualized treatment plan.

We proudly provide hearing healthcare services for patients in the Fair Lawn, Hackensack and Paramus communities. Call 201-794-0120 or contact us online to schedule your hearing evaluation today.

One of the most important aspects for longevity of your hearing instruments, which often gets ignored or put low on the priority list, is maintenance of the instruments. Read on to find out more about common problems with hearing aids and how to avoid them or understand the issues before they arise.

A little about hearing aids first…While many hearing aids today are made to a certain IP standard (IP stands for International Protection) to withstand dust and moisture, there are certain areas of the hearing aid which are more at risk. For example, the piece where the amplified sound comes from, the receiver or speaker, cannot have any complete coverings over it otherwise you wouldn’t hear anything. The receiver/speaker is generally deep inside of your ear, which can be very moist, has ear-wax, etc… This fact makes this part the single most troublesome area of the hearing aid. We see far more failed receivers from wax or moisture than any other problem. We also find that there are some people whose receivers fail more often, due to the conditions of their ear (regardless of hearing aid manufacturer) while others never have an issue.

Additionally, hearing aids which are worn behind the ear, are constantly being affected by sweat, hair spray, dust, heavy rains, etc… Most people who have constant issues with the piece behind their ear typically sweat more, work in dirty/dusty environments, etc… Ear Gear, a fabric covering for the hearing aid, is a good way to prevent issues with this part. Back to the IP rating - many of the behind the ear or receiver in the ear style hearing aids while they are rated against intrusion by sweat, dust, etc… will eventually fail due to moisture and/or material. Sweat, especially, can be very corrosive and damaging over time. So, even if your hearing aid is rated against moisture and debris, over time materials break down so it is important to try and reduce damaging effects.

Now for maintenance…

Now that you know a little bit about the common failure points on hearing aids, how do you go about preventing problems? If you are the type that experience frequent problems due to wax or moisture the best thing you can do is utilize ear gear on your instruments (if a BTE or RIC) and place your instruments in a drying unit, such as one like THIS, made by Ear Technology. Additionally, be sure to wipe off the openings of the hearing aid(s) as shown in this video. Do this in the morning before using them as wax and material has had a chance to dry and will flake off easier.

Many hearing aids now have a wax protection system often referred to as no wax, which is a small replaceable white cup that collects wax and can help prevent it from damaging the receiver/speaker. Check out our video on how to change it here. It is important to note that as with all other problems, the frequency at which you need to replace this piece will vary significantly. We recommend replacing this piece once a month as preventative maintenance.

Finally, it is important to realize that very small hearing aids have very small openings and can be affected by a surprisingly small amount of ear wax or similar debris. You may put your hearing aid in today and a piece of wax sitting just inside your ear canal can plug up the receiver immediately rendering the hearing aid useless. Remember these steps when your hearing aids stops working:

  1. Make sure you have a verified good battery in the hearing aid. If you have two hearing aids, switch the batteries and see if that helps.
  2. If you are sure there is a good battery, change the no wax (or remove it if you don’t have a replacement) and see if the hearing aid starts working.
  3. Other things to check would be blockage at the ear mold, silicone dome (if applicable), and microphone openings (where the sound enters the hearing aid.)
  4. Finally, it is possible the hearing aid does have something wrong with it. In which case it is time to visit us!

In our next case study, we will be examining the story of Fred (an alias). Fred came to us after a personal recommendation from a family friend after multiple visits to multiple hearing professionals. Fred’s story goes like this:

Fred had been to multiple professionals searching for the best results with hearing aids but ran into some issues which left him in search of something better. His past experiences had shown him that while the professionals he visited had mostly been very kind, caring people there was a lack of:

You may have noticed our recurring theme, “where you go is more important than what you get.” In support of this, we will be posting some case studies reviewing different situations where the services we provide made a big difference for someone who was otherwise not using hearing aids they received somewhere else.

In this case, the patient had good quality hearing aids they were fit with somewhere else but never received the proper benefit from them. After repeated visits to her original provider, she came to us hoping that we would be able to help her hear better with those same hearing aids. Below outlines the problems she came to us with and how we were able to help get her hearing well consistently with those same devices. The names used in the story are fake, for everyone’s privacy of course!

The business of fitting hearing aids is one that is not without competition, especially in a densely populated area such as northern New Jersey. All business’ have competition to a certain extent however we believe a business which thrives by providing a highly specialized service (not just a commoditized product) falls into a different realm. Successfully combining professional ability, honesty, candor, ability to listen and understand your customers, and empathy - is not something done equally well among all working people.

This is in fact why some business’ providing professional services do a better job than others. When It comes to fitting hearing aids, which is a process whose

Properly fit, quality hearing aids can be expensive. It is important to realize that the price for "hearing aids" encompasses much more than just the devices themselves (considering they are being purchased through a hearing healthcare professional).  To properly answer this question, consider the following:

-       Quality, high performing hearing devices cost the manufacturers of these devices considerable resources to research and develop, produce (on a relatively small scale compared to cell phones or computers), and support (all devices come with a warranty).  Hearing aids are used in a pretty rough environment exposed to ear wax, sweat, dust, hairspray, etc…so that warranty is important.

Untreated hearing loss (not wearing a hearing aid) can lead to social, psychological and physical issues. While the effects of hearing loss are different for each individual, most hearing-impaired people suffer some consequences until they seek treatment.

Ahrens Hearing Aid Center in Fair Lawn, NJ, can assist you on your path to healthy hearing. Call 201-794-0120 today to schedule an appointment.

Studies have linked untreated hearing loss to:

Social consequences, including:

  • Lack of concentration
  • Problems communicating with your spouse, relatives and friends
  • Problems communicating at work
  • Reduced social activity
  • Isolation and withdrawal

Psychological consequences, including:

  • Sadness and depression
  • Feelings of embarrassment, guilt, shame and anger
  • Low self-esteem and self-criticism
  • Increased anxiety

Physical consequences, including:

  • Frequent headaches
  • Stress
  • Sexual problems
  • Tiredness and exhaustion
  • Sleeping and eating problems

The National Council on Aging (NCOA) linked untreated hearing loss to serious mental health challenges, especially in seniors. In a survey of those with untreated hearing issues, the NCOA found that two-thirds of the respondents age 55 and over didn’t believe they needed a hearing aid. About half of the non-users cited the cost of hearing aids. And, one in five expressed embarrassment, and said that hearing aids would make them feel old.

However, hearing loss isn’t just an ailment of aging – it affects all ages, even those in early childhood. For young sufferers, even a mild case of hearing loss can cause difficulty learning, delayed speech and difficultly building interpersonal skills. Children with untreated hearing loss might have difficulty in school and developing healthy self-esteem.

At Ahrens Hearing Center, our caring staff provides full-care hearing loss support. We perform thorough audiometric evaluations to gauge your hearing abilities and limitations. If you need hearing aids, we provide hearing device sales, fittings and other services necessary for your individualized treatment plan.

We proudly provide hearing healthcare services for patients in the Fair Lawn, Hackensack and Paramus communities. Call 201-794-0120 or contact us online to schedule your hearing evaluation today.

One of the most important aspects for longevity of your hearing instruments, which often gets ignored or put low on the priority list, is maintenance of the instruments. Read on to find out more about common problems with hearing aids and how to avoid them or understand the issues before they arise.

A little about hearing aids first…While many hearing aids today are made to a certain IP standard (IP stands for International Protection) to withstand dust and moisture, there are certain areas of the hearing aid which are more at risk. For example, the piece where the amplified sound comes from, the receiver or speaker, cannot have any complete coverings over it otherwise you wouldn’t hear anything. The receiver/speaker is generally deep inside of your ear, which can be very moist, has ear-wax, etc… This fact makes this part the single most troublesome area of the hearing aid. We see far more failed receivers from wax or moisture than any other problem. We also find that there are some people whose receivers fail more often, due to the conditions of their ear (regardless of hearing aid manufacturer) while others never have an issue.

Additionally, hearing aids which are worn behind the ear, are constantly being affected by sweat, hair spray, dust, heavy rains, etc… Most people who have constant issues with the piece behind their ear typically sweat more, work in dirty/dusty environments, etc… Ear Gear, a fabric covering for the hearing aid, is a good way to prevent issues with this part. Back to the IP rating - many of the behind the ear or receiver in the ear style hearing aids while they are rated against intrusion by sweat, dust, etc… will eventually fail due to moisture and/or material. Sweat, especially, can be very corrosive and damaging over time. So, even if your hearing aid is rated against moisture and debris, over time materials break down so it is important to try and reduce damaging effects.

Now for maintenance…

Now that you know a little bit about the common failure points on hearing aids, how do you go about preventing problems? If you are the type that experience frequent problems due to wax or moisture the best thing you can do is utilize ear gear on your instruments (if a BTE or RIC) and place your instruments in a drying unit, such as one like THIS, made by Ear Technology. Additionally, be sure to wipe off the openings of the hearing aid(s) as shown in this video. Do this in the morning before using them as wax and material has had a chance to dry and will flake off easier.

Many hearing aids now have a wax protection system often referred to as no wax, which is a small replaceable white cup that collects wax and can help prevent it from damaging the receiver/speaker. Check out our video on how to change it here. It is important to note that as with all other problems, the frequency at which you need to replace this piece will vary significantly. We recommend replacing this piece once a month as preventative maintenance.

Finally, it is important to realize that very small hearing aids have very small openings and can be affected by a surprisingly small amount of ear wax or similar debris. You may put your hearing aid in today and a piece of wax sitting just inside your ear canal can plug up the receiver immediately rendering the hearing aid useless. Remember these steps when your hearing aids stops working:

  1. Make sure you have a verified good battery in the hearing aid. If you have two hearing aids, switch the batteries and see if that helps.
  2. If you are sure there is a good battery, change the no wax (or remove it if you don’t have a replacement) and see if the hearing aid starts working.
  3. Other things to check would be blockage at the ear mold, silicone dome (if applicable), and microphone openings (where the sound enters the hearing aid.)
  4. Finally, it is possible the hearing aid does have something wrong with it. In which case it is time to visit us!