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Being in business for over 45 years, we have seen many changes in hearing healthcare and a few things that have stayed the same. Ask many who have been in the hearing healthcare industry for more than a few years and they will likely agree: insurance and hearing aids is confusing at best.

Tinnitus is essentially a ringing or buzzing noise that you hear when there is no actual external source of the sound. Most people experience tinnitus… if you sit in a quiet room and concentrate, most people can hear some sort of noise. For the majority it is not debilitating, we may notice it but it doesn’t bother us. On the other hand, tinnitus can be quite the annoyance and downright life altering in some extreme cases. Approximately 50 million Americans experience tinnitus.

Tinnitus is a phantom noise which in most cases does not actually exist (while some cases exist where another person can hear the noise.) Many things can cause tinnitus including prolonged exposure to loud sounds, some medicines, other physical conditions, the list goes on. Hearing loss and tinnitus are often present together however tinnitus does not cause hearing loss nor does hearing loss cause tinnitus.

 

A common question we get daily is, "how long will my hearing aids last?" and "when should I replace them?" The answer everyone loves is, "it depends!" It depends for a number of reasons.

Hearing aids are electronic devices that we wear. They are subject to our sweat, ear wax, humidity, oils, hairspray, etc… Everyone will have a different experience with the longevity of their hearing instruments dependent upon these factors and how well they care for the hearing instruments. One person’s hearing aid(s) can last years without ever having a problem, while some people have issues more frequently.

We often hear the argument that the reason only 20 percent of those with hearing loss actually gets hearing aids is because of the cost. Research has shown us that this is not the case. Even in countries with socialized medicine where one can get hearing aids (typically very basic hearing aids) for very low to no cost, the adoption rate is very similar to the US.

 

Why is this the case? There are many factors that might help explain the reasons for the low adoption rate of hearing aids however major reasons include:

So, why do you do so well (or poorly) with hearing aids while someone you know has quite the opposite experience? As always, that depends. We will cover some of the key reasons why there are so many different outcomes for different individuals using hearing aids.

       - The most important point is of course, who fit the hearing aids? The professional and office who support you can make all the difference regardless of the type or cost of instruments you purchase. The right professional will be able to fit the devices acoustically and physically so they integrate into your everyday life and provide actual benefit – resulting in hearing aids you actually want to wear!

Holidays can be a stressful and even isolating time for someone with hearing loss. Not being able to understand family and friends, repeatedly asking “huh” or “what”, or mis-hearing and responding incorrectly are all things that someone who has a hearing loss can experience. It is undoubtedly frustrating for the person themselves, but it can also be just as taxing on others as well.

Being in business for over 45 years, we have seen many changes in hearing healthcare and a few things that have stayed the same. Ask many who have been in the hearing healthcare industry for more than a few years and they will likely agree: insurance and hearing aids is confusing at best.

Tinnitus is essentially a ringing or buzzing noise that you hear when there is no actual external source of the sound. Most people experience tinnitus… if you sit in a quiet room and concentrate, most people can hear some sort of noise. For the majority it is not debilitating, we may notice it but it doesn’t bother us. On the other hand, tinnitus can be quite the annoyance and downright life altering in some extreme cases. Approximately 50 million Americans experience tinnitus.

Tinnitus is a phantom noise which in most cases does not actually exist (while some cases exist where another person can hear the noise.) Many things can cause tinnitus including prolonged exposure to loud sounds, some medicines, other physical conditions, the list goes on. Hearing loss and tinnitus are often present together however tinnitus does not cause hearing loss nor does hearing loss cause tinnitus.

 

A common question we get daily is, "how long will my hearing aids last?" and "when should I replace them?" The answer everyone loves is, "it depends!" It depends for a number of reasons.

Hearing aids are electronic devices that we wear. They are subject to our sweat, ear wax, humidity, oils, hairspray, etc… Everyone will have a different experience with the longevity of their hearing instruments dependent upon these factors and how well they care for the hearing instruments. One person’s hearing aid(s) can last years without ever having a problem, while some people have issues more frequently.

We often hear the argument that the reason only 20 percent of those with hearing loss actually gets hearing aids is because of the cost. Research has shown us that this is not the case. Even in countries with socialized medicine where one can get hearing aids (typically very basic hearing aids) for very low to no cost, the adoption rate is very similar to the US.

 

Why is this the case? There are many factors that might help explain the reasons for the low adoption rate of hearing aids however major reasons include:

So, why do you do so well (or poorly) with hearing aids while someone you know has quite the opposite experience? As always, that depends. We will cover some of the key reasons why there are so many different outcomes for different individuals using hearing aids.

       - The most important point is of course, who fit the hearing aids? The professional and office who support you can make all the difference regardless of the type or cost of instruments you purchase. The right professional will be able to fit the devices acoustically and physically so they integrate into your everyday life and provide actual benefit – resulting in hearing aids you actually want to wear!

Holidays can be a stressful and even isolating time for someone with hearing loss. Not being able to understand family and friends, repeatedly asking “huh” or “what”, or mis-hearing and responding incorrectly are all things that someone who has a hearing loss can experience. It is undoubtedly frustrating for the person themselves, but it can also be just as taxing on others as well.

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