Notice: Undefined variable: article in /home/ahrwebart/public_html/templates/ahrens/index.php on line 227

Blog

Blog


This is probably one of the biggest problems we deal with for hearing aids. Feedback, whistling, birds singing, whatever the user or person sitting near them perceives it as – it is annoying for everyone involved. There is however some reasons why this happens, and keeping it from happening is a form of art.

Whistling happens when the sound coming out of the hearing aid (which should go into your ear) is escaping back to the outside of the ear and being picked up again by the hearing aid. The tricky part about feedback is that we want the hearing aid to make the most snug fit as possible without feeling too bulky, causing irritation, or otherwise making the patient want to take them out. This “just snug enough” fit is very important to allowing us to program the device to meet your hearing loss and in some instances can take multiple adjustments to get right.

From what you may see in your mailbox, on the internet, or from various other outlets of information it is easy to think that the way to help hearing loss is to be fit with the latest and greatest hearing technology available today. Much of what is advertised stresses the most advanced hearing technology and various features and benefits.While the latest and greatest hearing aid contributes to helping someone hear to the best of their ability, it is only part of the “better hearing equation”.

Hearing is a perception. We gather sounds in both of our ears and that sound is transmitted to the brain to be processed. Everyone perceives what they are hearing from hearing aids differently. This means two people with the same “level” of hearing loss would require totally different fitting rationales (need to be programmed differently) or even different manufacturers in some cases. Often times, this is something that cannot be determined from the first visit. The hearing healthcare professional needs to know how to manipulate that product to make it acceptable for you and your specific hearing loss, which is a process that takes time to perfect.

Welcome to the Ahrens Hearing Center blog.

The purpose for this blog is to bring information to our local audience through the internet where we all know is a place where so much information is thrown around. Hearing health care has transformed wildly in the past years with internet playing a role and this will be our way to reach our local community and bring forth information about hearing healthcare that frankly is tough to find on the internet.

Through our years of being in business it is quite clear that many of our patients come into our office with very little knowledge about hearing loss and hearing aids. We have seen this lack of understanding result in poor choices regarding hearing health care including but not limited to:

  • The decision not to address a hearing loss
  • Delayed decision to address a hearing loss
  • Accommodating someone else's un-treated hearing loss
  • An improperly fit set of hearing devices or unrealistic expectations resulting in the "sock drawer" syndrome (hearing aids that were paid for but not used for various reasons)
  • The list goes on!

This is probably one of the biggest problems we deal with for hearing aids. Feedback, whistling, birds singing, whatever the user or person sitting near them perceives it as – it is annoying for everyone involved. There is however some reasons why this happens, and keeping it from happening is a form of art.

Whistling happens when the sound coming out of the hearing aid (which should go into your ear) is escaping back to the outside of the ear and being picked up again by the hearing aid. The tricky part about feedback is that we want the hearing aid to make the most snug fit as possible without feeling too bulky, causing irritation, or otherwise making the patient want to take them out. This “just snug enough” fit is very important to allowing us to program the device to meet your hearing loss and in some instances can take multiple adjustments to get right.

From what you may see in your mailbox, on the internet, or from various other outlets of information it is easy to think that the way to help hearing loss is to be fit with the latest and greatest hearing technology available today. Much of what is advertised stresses the most advanced hearing technology and various features and benefits.While the latest and greatest hearing aid contributes to helping someone hear to the best of their ability, it is only part of the “better hearing equation”.

Hearing is a perception. We gather sounds in both of our ears and that sound is transmitted to the brain to be processed. Everyone perceives what they are hearing from hearing aids differently. This means two people with the same “level” of hearing loss would require totally different fitting rationales (need to be programmed differently) or even different manufacturers in some cases. Often times, this is something that cannot be determined from the first visit. The hearing healthcare professional needs to know how to manipulate that product to make it acceptable for you and your specific hearing loss, which is a process that takes time to perfect.

Welcome to the Ahrens Hearing Center blog.

The purpose for this blog is to bring information to our local audience through the internet where we all know is a place where so much information is thrown around. Hearing health care has transformed wildly in the past years with internet playing a role and this will be our way to reach our local community and bring forth information about hearing healthcare that frankly is tough to find on the internet.

Through our years of being in business it is quite clear that many of our patients come into our office with very little knowledge about hearing loss and hearing aids. We have seen this lack of understanding result in poor choices regarding hearing health care including but not limited to:

  • The decision not to address a hearing loss
  • Delayed decision to address a hearing loss
  • Accommodating someone else's un-treated hearing loss
  • An improperly fit set of hearing devices or unrealistic expectations resulting in the "sock drawer" syndrome (hearing aids that were paid for but not used for various reasons)
  • The list goes on!

http://joining.tk/