The drawer hearing aid, how to avoid it, and who is the best person to seek hearing healthcare from…

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We are not fond of the “drawer” hearing aid that is the hearing aid someone gets only to have them sit unused for long periods of time - usually in a drawer. There can be multiple reasons why this happens ranging from simply not wanting to hear everything (some people just like the quiet!) to not getting a proper hearing aid fitting and everything in between.


If you do indeed want to hear, and you purchased a quality set of hearing instruments but aren’t getting much of a benefit from them, chances are something can be done about it. It is true that there are varying levels of “technology” in hearing aids which can vary their performance in difficult listening environments. It is also true that everyone’s brain and hearing loss is unique, which will play into the overall outcome with hearing aids. However, with all things being equal, if your hearing aids are not fit properly then you can expect less than optimal results. Fortunately you have options. 

 

Every hearing healthcare professional (whether it be a hearing aid specialist or audiologist) must pass a licensing exam and hold a state medical license to be able to fit hearing devices. This means that if you receive your hearing healthcare through an office in NJ, they have been tested to assure minimal competencies in fitting hearing devices. What this does not mean however, is that everyone who fits hearing aids is created equal. It is both an art and a science and some people are better at it then others – which will translate into different results for the end user.


We would all likely agree that while all doctors have gone through extensive schooling, training, and testing, not all of them are created equal. Some doctors have much better bedside manner, ability to interpret testing, intuition that tells them something that another doctor might not recognize, etc… This analogy applies directly to many other professions including hearing healthcare.


The individual fitting your hearing devices can make or break your experience – no matter where you went or what combination of letters follow the professional’s name, your results really do depend on how well rounded that person is in doing their job.

We are not fond of the “drawer” hearing aid that is the hearing aid someone gets only to have them sit unused for long periods of time - usually in a drawer. There can be multiple reasons why this happens ranging from simply not wanting to hear everything (some people just like the quiet!) to not getting a proper hearing aid fitting and everything in between.


If you do indeed want to hear, and you purchased a quality set of hearing instruments but aren’t getting much of a benefit from them, chances are something can be done about it. It is true that there are varying levels of “technology” in hearing aids which can vary their performance in difficult listening environments. It is also true that everyone’s brain and hearing loss is unique, which will play into the overall outcome with hearing aids. However, with all things being equal, if your hearing aids are not fit properly then you can expect less than optimal results. Fortunately you have options. 

 

Every hearing healthcare professional (whether it be a hearing aid specialist or audiologist) must pass a licensing exam and hold a state medical license to be able to fit hearing devices. This means that if you receive your hearing healthcare through an office in NJ, they have been tested to assure minimal competencies in fitting hearing devices. What this does not mean however, is that everyone who fits hearing aids is created equal. It is both an art and a science and some people are better at it then others – which will translate into different results for the end user.


We would all likely agree that while all doctors have gone through extensive schooling, training, and testing, not all of them are created equal. Some doctors have much better bedside manner, ability to interpret testing, intuition that tells them something that another doctor might not recognize, etc… This analogy applies directly to many other professions including hearing healthcare.


The individual fitting your hearing devices can make or break your experience – no matter where you went or what combination of letters follow the professional’s name, your results really do depend on how well rounded that person is in doing their job.