What is Noise Induced Hearing Loss?

What is Noise Induced Hearing Loss?

What is Noise Induced Hearing Loss?


NOISE INDUCED HEARING LOSS: WHAT IS IT?

Car alarms, lawn mowers, stereos, and roaring traffic fill our cities with sounds that are seemingly benign but carry serious implications if we are not mindful of our surroundings. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL), whether it is temporary or permanent is hearing impairment resulting from exposure to high decibel (loud) sound. Hearing may deteriorate from repeated noise exposure, such as loud music or background noise over a period of time; known as Gradually Developing noise induced hearing loss or it may also occur from an acute, one-time, high intensity noise incident such as a gunshot or firework; known as Acoustic Trauma.


WHAT CAUSES IT?

Noise Induced Hearing Loss occurs when too much sound intensity is transmitted into and through the auditory system. Loud sounds delivered with equal intensity or over extended periods of time, regardless of their source, are equally dangerous and can cause acoustic trauma to the ear. This trauma can result in hearing loss, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), and occasional dizziness (vertigo), as well as non-auditory effects, such as increases in heart rate and blood pressure. Unlike acoustic trauma, gradual NIHL can be caused by multiple exposures to any source of excessive volume, like stereos, concerts, nightclubs, excessive noise in the workplace, and personal listening devices such as iPods. In both types, loud sound overstimulates delicate hearing cells, leading to the permanent injury or death of the cells. Once you experience hearing loss it cannot be restored.


HOW CAN HEARING LOSS BE PREVENTED?

It is important to understand your risk factors for Noise Induced Hearing Loss as well as your options for prevention. Several factors associated with the increase of a person's susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss include but are not limited to; your occupation, family history of hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency, and older age. Hearing loss can also be prevented through the use of simple, commonly available, and inexpensive tools such as ear protection (i.e. earplugs and earmuffs). Depending on how much control you have over the environment, one of the best preventions against hearing loss is lowering the volume of sound at its source, or removing yourself from the area and limiting your amount of time of exposure. Currently there are no cures for hearing loss, but rather assistive devices and therapies to try and manage the symptoms.


Are you concerned about hearing loss for yourself or a loved one? Do you have concerns about noise exposure and want to schedule a hearing screening? Please schedule your appointment at the Ahrens Hearing Aid Center office in Fair Lawn, New Jersey at 201-794-0120.

NOISE INDUCED HEARING LOSS: WHAT IS IT?

Car alarms, lawn mowers, stereos, and roaring traffic fill our cities with sounds that are seemingly benign but carry serious implications if we are not mindful of our surroundings. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL), whether it is temporary or permanent is hearing impairment resulting from exposure to high decibel (loud) sound. Hearing may deteriorate from repeated noise exposure, such as loud music or background noise over a period of time; known as Gradually Developing noise induced hearing loss or it may also occur from an acute, one-time, high intensity noise incident such as a gunshot or firework; known as Acoustic Trauma.


WHAT CAUSES IT?

Noise Induced Hearing Loss occurs when too much sound intensity is transmitted into and through the auditory system. Loud sounds delivered with equal intensity or over extended periods of time, regardless of their source, are equally dangerous and can cause acoustic trauma to the ear. This trauma can result in hearing loss, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), and occasional dizziness (vertigo), as well as non-auditory effects, such as increases in heart rate and blood pressure. Unlike acoustic trauma, gradual NIHL can be caused by multiple exposures to any source of excessive volume, like stereos, concerts, nightclubs, excessive noise in the workplace, and personal listening devices such as iPods. In both types, loud sound overstimulates delicate hearing cells, leading to the permanent injury or death of the cells. Once you experience hearing loss it cannot be restored.


HOW CAN HEARING LOSS BE PREVENTED?

It is important to understand your risk factors for Noise Induced Hearing Loss as well as your options for prevention. Several factors associated with the increase of a person's susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss include but are not limited to; your occupation, family history of hearing loss, diabetes mellitus, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency, and older age. Hearing loss can also be prevented through the use of simple, commonly available, and inexpensive tools such as ear protection (i.e. earplugs and earmuffs). Depending on how much control you have over the environment, one of the best preventions against hearing loss is lowering the volume of sound at its source, or removing yourself from the area and limiting your amount of time of exposure. Currently there are no cures for hearing loss, but rather assistive devices and therapies to try and manage the symptoms.


Are you concerned about hearing loss for yourself or a loved one? Do you have concerns about noise exposure and want to schedule a hearing screening? Please schedule your appointment at the Ahrens Hearing Aid Center office in Fair Lawn, New Jersey at 201-794-0120.